Posted tagged ‘media governance’

Wikileaks as a promising sign of the amplification of media governance (2)

3 février 2011

Promising as it is, the catalytic process puts a heavy burden on civil society actors that have to monitor the process and ensure that it is not censored or abruptly stopped without public debate.  This is always a difficult task because of the level of mobilization and attention it entails.  The independent press has been acting within its proper functions and missions, in creating a symbiotic conflict and in fuelling the debate while representing the positions of the various claims makers. These have to mediatise the ethical dilemmas raised by specific cultural contradictions such as openness and secrecy in diplomacy in the cyberist moment. The role of civil society groups as interpretive communities of practice capable of some degree of mobilisation is to maintain the negotiation at the intersection between content- and process-competences, with a mix between global and local initiatives to promote generative solutions in the future and ensure their legitimacy and acceptance.

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Wikileaks as an abortive sign of the amplification of media governance (1)

3 février 2011

The Wikileaks media panic is part of the amplification of governance process that has been at work in the cyberist moment, when the shift from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 is accelerating change by leaps and bounds. ICT-driven media have moved from a centralized technology that allowed for little participation to a decentralized network of broadband applications and browsers enabling platforms such as Wikileaks. In contrast to the Web 1.0 client-server model, dominated by tethered applications, Web 2.0 uses distributed network architecture via peer-to-peer coordination (P2P) and shared resources (such as disk storage or network bandwidth). The users are both suppliers and consumers of information. In this paradigm shift, from the post-modernist era to the cyberist era, the behavior of the end-users, as they become contributors and producers of information, tends to displace traditional secrecy to the margins of Web 1.0, as only a small part of the privacy issue, while other concerns, such as anonymity, traceability, surveillance and counter-surveillance, come to the center of Web 2.0.

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